Fluffy Edwardian Gown + How I Learned to Clean it

So I actually own very few antique garments. I don’t have much space for storage, so it’s not something that I seek out…

363

But when something like this Edwardian gown jumps off the rack at me, how can I say no??

366

I bought this dress almost three years ago, now, and didn’t know what to do with it for quite awhile. I was so scared I’d somehow damage it, that I just tucked it away in my trunk until I could do some research on how to properly clean antique linens.

367

The dress is in really good shape – no major holes or tears and the fabric is strong. The only thing is that elastic around the neckline has lost some of its elasticity.

369

There are a couple of noticeable stains towards the bottom of the dress.

371

Particularly at the hem. So I knew I would need to clean it sooner or later so I could pack it away and store it properly. After doing lots of research on the best way to clean antique garments (opinions vary quite broadly), I picked up a bottle of Woolite Extra Delicates and filled the tub with lukewarm water.

373

Holding my breath, I carefully laid the dress on top of the water and pressed it down evenly. I let it soak in the water for several hours, refilling the soap + water a couple of times before rinsing it very, very clean.

374

Then I rolled it carefully up in a towel to wring out the excess water and carried outside.

379

So it could dry completely in the sun.

381

The stains came out of the bottom!

IMG_20160512_144241

And the dress made it through the whole thing in great shape! It’s been carefully packed away now for a day when I have more space and can take it out to examine it more closely.

The dress taught me a lot about the careful laundering of vintage textiles, though, and I’ve used the same method on other linens since then with similar success.

20160925_13575720160925_15140020160925_151405

It’s always surprising to see how dirty the water is! The fabric always looks so clean at first!


On a related note, I recently bought a bag of Retro Clean after seeing some great success stories on Instagram. I’m really eager to give it a try. Has anyone tried it before? If so, what did you think of it?

Advertisements

Lida Rose Corset (HSM #6)

This project held a lot of firsts for me. It was my first time using a printed PDF pattern, sizing up a pattern, and inserting a busk. I’m very proud of how it all turned out, considering the fact that (strictly speaking) this is the first corset I’ve ever made and that I was always terrified of making one. Turns out it’s a lot easier than I had expected!

The pattern I used is a free one, Hip Curve Corset, by Ralph Pink. It came only in a UK size 10 so I spent an afternoon measuring and resizing it to fit me. I incorporated into this corset some of the adjustments I made when sewing my stays last year.

Please keep your fingers crossed that I did everything right; I haven’t actually tried on the finished product yet!

DSC_8407

I’m in love with this corset. I adore the hue of the purple and the feel of the silk and the detail of the lace at the top. Corsets from the Edwardian period have always held a particular fascination for me (well, lingerie in general) so it’s thrilling to have one for myself.

Inspiration

The inside is a little crazy, I will admit. I ran out of purple tape to use for the bones and started using peach instead (it’s less saturated in real life) and some of the seam allowances are poking out inside so I definitely could be neater next time.

DSC_8412.jpg

How does this item have to do with travel, you may ask? Well, I made this corset specifically to take on a trip with me in the fall. To make it easy to pack, carry, and put on I kept it fairly lightly boned, left the garter attachments off the bottom, and used two layers.

As for the story behind the name of the corset, I spent a good chunk of my time sewing with The Music Man (2003) on in the background. I may or may not have watched it (literally) five times…

So, naturally, I had the songs stuck in my head for days and one of my favorites is Lida Rose so there you go!

The Challenge: Travel (HSM #6)
Fabric: White cotton duck, purple silk
Pattern: Hip Curve Corset by Ralph Pink
Year: c. 1905
Notions: White thread, busk, silver grommets, white lace, zip ties
How historically accurate is it? Don’t even ask lol
Hours to complete: I can’t even guess. I worked on it for about 5 solid days throughout the month.
First worn: Not yet!
Total cost: Zip ties were the only thing I actually bought for the project ($6). Everything else was from my stash (if I remember correctly: 1 yard cotton duck ($6), 1 yard purple silk ($3), busk ($3.25), and the other pieces didn’t have a significant cost).